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Welcome to Rogues Gallery Hulett Wyoming







Prints And Posters ***PLEASE SCROLL DOWN ****








********RODEO POSTERS********

  Jim here,
 I just spoke to you last week and bought one of the rodeo posters,...
I just got it and it looks better in person then it does on line.! I should have bought 5 of these , they're that awesome!
    thanks bob!

*E mail sent June 10-13



The posters are the actual poster for the event.

This was the Miles City Bucking Horse Sale with the posters hung all over town.




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FOR POSTERS CALL ROGUES GALLERY 307-467-5849



2014 Buffalo Bill Cody Stampede Rodeo Poster



Now Available !

Posters available

20.00 plus 9.00 for shipping  to your door,...through the magic of the post office.

This is the Newest Poster in the Rodeo poster series. #7 in the series
Poster is 38 inches tall





















2014 Rodeo poster MILES CITY BUCKING HORSE SALE

Posters available

20.00 plus 9.00 for shipping  to your door,...through the magic of the post office.

This is the Newest Poster in the Rodeo poster series. #6 in the series
Poster is 38 inches tall






















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2012 Rodeo Poster DEADWOOD

Hot Off The Press The 2012 Poster (#5 in  the Bob Coronato Rodeo poster Series)

20.00   (signed by the Artist)




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2011 Rodeo Posters Available 20.00 ea.








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2010 Sheridan Wyo Rodeo Poster ( SOLD OUT )



RECENTLY SOLD OUT
CHECK BACK FOR AVAILABILITY
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2009 Hulett Rodeo poster *** SOLD OUT **

 

Check back, once in awhile I can buy one back and have it available for sale.

..

*****recently 1 was found, rolled up ,in a basement in Sheridan.  BUT NOW SOLD OUT****


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2008 Gold Rush Days Poster......***SOLD OUT**


Chech back, once in awhile I buy one back and have it for sale.

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Limited Edition on Canvas

The Horse Wrangler Gather'd The Morning Mounts:

"One That Had'n Lived The Life ... Couldn't Paint a Picture ...

To Please The Eye, of One That Had!"

by Bob Coronato

Like many kids, artist Bob Coronato grew up fascinated with the cowboy life. When he started to paint in earnest, he sold a painting to a man who thought he was good, but said he would be much better if he knew something about real cowboys. Upon graduating from Otis/Parsons Art School, he moved to Hulett,Wyoming (population 409) finding ranches that still "cowboy" in the old ways, realizing that the west he was searching for as a kid was still there, evidenced by Them's a Bunch-a Bronc Stomp'n...Sun

Fish'n...S.O.B.'s.

"I was once part of a brand crew that traveled with a 1880s chuck wagon," Coronato says of The Horse Wrangler... "Each evening, we would set the horses free to find water and grass. And each morning, before the sun came up, the horse wrangler rode out in the darkness to gather the horses from were they wandered the night before. As the ground started to shake and the wrangler drove the horses over the hill in the corral, I knew a long day was about to begin .... But I couldn't wait, it was like being part of a special history."


LIMITED EDITION CANVAS
Image size:
37"w x 28"h.
Edition Size:75

Published from the artist's original work, by Greenwich Workshop.

US: $750.00




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Limited Edition on Canvas


Title "Today we will look our best,...And you will take me where I want to go,...

Tomorrow they will tell stories of our deeds!"



LIMITED EDITION CANVAS
Image size:
29"w x 29"h.
Edition Size:35

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $850.00



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Limited Edition on Canvas

Title  
"Wait'n fer them to mother-up,... and bed down"

"Today, just as in the past, after calves are branded, they're taken to a summer pasture. The cows and their calves become separated in the drive and anyone who has moved large numbers of cows knows that one thing is for sure-it's loud. One by one the cows quiet down and mother-up, wandering off in pairs.

After a long day of moving cows, you can feel your body starting to creak. As the day begins to cool off, you and your horse just sit there. This was always an introspective time for me, sitting on my horse, waiting. You have time to look around and think. As the cows pair up it gets quieter and quieter, until there is just silence."


LIMITED EDITION CANVAS
Image size:
13"w x 10"h.
Edition Size:75

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $225.00




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Limited Edition on Canvas

Noth'n Like the Feel'n of Rid'n a Fine Horse . . .
Through Wyoming Country . . . That's Still Considered Frontier"


by Bob Coronato

"It's already October, and a long dry summer is coming to an end with cool wind blowing over the powdered ground. On this day I get up at three a.m. and load up the outfit (truck) with my saddle, chinks, spurs and my trusty Carhartt jacket. I head out on the frosty morning down a dark, lonely road past Devil's Tower. I leave Hulett, population 429, to head to an even more remote section of Wyoming. I can hardly keep my eyes open as I drive over the endless dirt roads, listening to Neil Young. As the song sets the mood in the darkness I can almost feel a sense of nostalgia for what I'm doing and where I'm going. It seems in just a few years this day may just be a story and a memory because this part of the country is changing fast.

"I already know what to expect from the coming day. I just soak up the smell of the cold sage, the calls of the night birds, the dust clouds creating a rooster tail behind my outfit and, before I know it, this moment in time is gone. I head down the road over cattle guards, pass open-range cows staring at me, too cold to move, and head out to a little piece of dirt called Oshoto, Wyoming.

"Oshoto is miles of flat, grass-covered prairie as far as you can see with probably more bald eagles than people. I meet up with Stormy Burch and his sons Dallas and Austin about halfway, leave my outfit and saddle my horse. We load the trailer and head down the road to Stormy's brother's place. Stormy offers some coffee and a few jokes.

"We arrive at his brother Max's place, a big ranch with hundreds of thousands of acres of open plains and rough ridges to ride. Several crews are gathering at the same time, and it seems they move fast here-no sooner do the trucks stop than we're mounted and moving at a fast lope for what seems like miles. We ride hard, about fifteen of us riding lined up, breast-to-breast, horse hooves pounding the ground, coughs and puffs of frosty air are all you hear and see. Stormy jokes he is riding his 'fire breathin' dragon' since his horse is always a little jumpy and big puffs of steam rise up as he coughs out the chilly air.

"Stormy rides a beautiful bay-colored paint horse named Cork that has a little 'outlaw' in him. The horse came out of his brothers bucking horse string (his brother raises horses for rodeos, and many have gone to the national finals), and every now and them remembers he is still wild. I've never seen Cork come out of the trailer on all fours. When you try to unload him, he seems to fly out backwards and buck, kick and scream. Cork is always about half un-corked, acting as if he is always ready to buck you off for the littlest reason. A horse like that was strong and could really work all day. That's why Stormy likes him.

"As we ride, someone's tellin' a story of a guy who gets bucked off: 'He got thrown so hard, he kilt the sage where he hit!' We ride on to a ridge that overlooks a large valley, and split up in groups of two or three to gather the draws and check for cows. The sun hasn't risen above the horizon yet, and it seems to cast a strange blue light over the wet, frost-covered sage. As we ride, jackrabbits and prairie chickens jump out, but the horses don't bother too much now.

"I ride with Stormy and he shares stories of days gone by, and points out a few tipi rings. It's an exciting time of the year, everyone is in good spirits, the gathering is the year's work coming to an end, and there is always that barbecue at the end of the day.

"We gather the cows from the tall, sage-covered plains and point them in a general direction. After they decide to move, or take off at a run, we move on to find some more. The sun finally starts turning the sky a deep scarlet red as it cracks the horizon, and the prairie lights up in a way that's hard to relate. The sage goes from fading gray and green to a sharp, crisp orange, with intense long purple shadows. As we near the herd you can hear the whistles and calls of other riders and people you haven't seen for months or even a year. The friendly call-out across the open flats usually starts out with, 'So how are ya, Bob? What've ya been working on?'

"To me, it's a scene that has to be reaching its life's limits; the open ranges are too valuable to land developers and it's a slow creeping death for the West as the land gets developed. The end seems inevitable. For now, though, it's free, big, open and beautiful. I moved here for the same reason others do, and that's the very thing that will eventually make days like this one a thing of legend. I get a sense that even the people working have thought about that as well, and the stories always start with, 'Well, back when we used to...' Someday, that's all there will be left-just stories.

"We all sit on different hilltops, creating a channel for some of the other guys to drive the strays through so they could be gathered in a big group and moved. I love sitting on a mount, high atop a rocky outcropping on a ridge and listening to the wind whistle as it blows across the horse's mane. It's a great way to observe the whole country, the little dots gathering littler dots and horses calling across the expanse to each other. I see something running fast across a hill side, and I think it runs quite different than a deer or antelope, which becomes a common scene as everyone scours the sage for cows. Antelope and mule deer are always running all over, bouncing across the flats, but this was different, and I think I may just be delirious because it is early, but it looks like a big mountain lion.

"As the cows come through the gap that we made, the guys start filing in and eventually everyone is riding side by side pushing the herd towards the other groups gathered, That's when I hear Stormy's loud, excited voice going on about the lion he spooked up, and it becomes a topic for the next few miles.

"The cows start linin' out single file, and the crew starts taking their positions. There's the Boss ridin' point along with what seems to be his best hand, and the swing riders all take an even spacing along the column of cows. Not too close to push them too fast, not too far as to be useless and let a stray turn back. The drags ride up behind the herd in a tight formation, side by side, keeping the quitters in line and making lots of noise to keep 'em moving. Stormy cracks the bull-whip occasionally and the first few times they take off at a run. The cows stretch out and cover several miles, from the leaders to the drags. The herd snakes out and stretches as far as you can see and keep going. At one point, something spooks the bunch, and the herd takes off at a dead run-the lead cows run and the rest follow as about half the crew takes off in a leap to turn the lead cows. It looks like a swarm of bees sweeping down the hillside and snaking through the bottom of the coolies. I can see the guys in front with their slickers flying in the air behind them as they race off to try and turn the cows into one another to get them to stop. Every second the boss loses money as they sweat off the weight they gained all year. Finally the cows settle down and it would be smart to stay away from Max (the boss) for a while.

"The sun is high in the sky and it is great to feel the warmth of the sun, along with a steady cold and crisp wind, blowing across the tall golden grass. We ride along the Belle Fourche River, and the crystal-clear water reflects the sky and the wispy clouds along the cottonwoods and old oak trees. As my cheeks chap in the wind, I ride along, somewhat overloaded with information I'm trying to file away so I can paint this somehow.

"Just then, a large herd of wild horses comes running over the hill wanting to see what this was all about. About 150 of the group run up a ridge prancing around with their noses and tails in the air. Then, like a scared flock of birds, the entire herd just sweeps down the next hill out of sight. We ride most of the day toward our goal: the shipping pens.

"I wanted to create a painting that summed up what it was to be a cowboy-the freedom, the landscape, the teamwork of a bunch of hands, and the sheer vastness of the workplace. This was and is a little piece of my American frontier. A great horse, a great rig, and a beautiful day like this is all you need to create a feeling you'll never forget."

The expansive size of this Greenwich Workshop Museum EditionTM Giclée Canvas will bring the open range to your hallway, great room or office.

MuseumEditionTM
Greenwich Workshop Fine Art Giclée Canvas:
limited to 25 s/n.
80"w x 24"h (unstretched).

$2450





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Limited Edition on Canvas

title

"June 9th in the Black Hills ...

P'ard all I remember, 'twas a cold som-bitch"

by Bob Coronato

"This was a day I'd been waiting for since I was a kid," says cowboy artist Bob Coronato about his latest release. Coronato relates the genesis for this piece, based on his experience working on a ranch on the border of South Dakota and Wyoming. "I was there to help the Foreman, a colorful, tough old man of few words, move cows to their summer pasture. We got up at 4:30 a.m. and my friend George suggested I wear my heavy winter gear. Since it was 75 degrees the day before, I thought he was pulling a prank. I decided not to take a chance and brought the gear. I saddled up my horse, which was bucking and kicking to shake out the cold.

Hoping to get a good view of the thousands of cows snaking up the limestone canyon, I went to the front and took a small bunch ahead to point the rest of the herd. The temperature dropped as we got higher into the mountains and the rain turned to large wet flakes covering the canyon walls. As the cows were heating up, steam started to rise off their backs until billowing clouds rose up through the canyon like a train puffing through the Black Hills. I was glad I had my slicker and wild rag around my neck as the snow turned into a blizzard. I sat tucked up under a pine tree branch listening to the flakes through the trees, hoping I'd never forget a detail of this amazing day. As the snow collected on my hat and the black dye ran down my back, I couldn't wait to paint this scene, unfolding before my eyes. With about ten inches of snow on the ground, George and I rode up the side of the herd yelling 'this is the life for me!'"

Image size:
48"w x 22"h.
Edition Size:50

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $795.00




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Limited Edition on Canvas

title  
Relay Horses in camp, Crow fair 2000: "August celebrations maintain the culture, in this age of incredible change"



"Crow Fair is a nearly hundred-year-old tradition," says Bob Coronato, "held each August for the reunion of family clans and the celebration of Crow Indian culture. I have attended Crow Fair for many years and I'm always impressed with the singing, the relay horse races and the thousands of tepees. The Crows fought governmental pressures to change, and as a result being at the fair is like going back in time, because their culture has been amazingly preserved. It's uplifting and I look forward to it, year after year."



LIMITED EDITION CANVAS
Image size:
14"w x 10"h.
Edition Size:75

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $235.00




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Open Edition Art Print


Signed by the Artist
20.00

 




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Limited Edition on Canvas

Title

"No place,...for amateurs!"

"In the northeast corner of Wyoming on the Montana border, the ranches are big, the grass is plentiful and the country is rough," says artist Bob Coronato of No Place ... For Amateurs! "With few people for hundreds of miles, this is perfect cowboy country for the tough, spirited, pioneer types who call it home. A few years ago, I was on a brand crew traveling with a chuck wagon, a rumuda of horses and bed roll wagon. Gathering 10,000 acre pastures and branding about 300 cows a day for about 12 days straight, we woke before dawn and worked until dark, moving camp each time we finished gathering all the stock within a days ride. With the Montana Badlands in the distance, we were working the open country, gathering the livestock for branding and building temporary corrals. Weather describes the high plains best: In the morning you had on winter coats, long johns and silk scarves to wrap your neck from the wind, by the end of the day, it usually rained or snowed at least once and then by late afternoon it was hot enough for short sleeves. Only the toughest spirit enjoys this climate and the cowboys I was working with not only thrived in it, but were some of the best hands I'd ever had the privilege to work with.

Over the two week stretch there were a few bad wrecks and the usual close calls. One guy got bucked off and broke his arm. I drove him 100 miles to the Cowboy Back Bar for a shot before going down the road to the hospital. On the way back to camp, we stopped at the Stoneville Saloon ("Cheap Drinks and Lousy Food" reads the sign outside). By the next day he figured he healed up enough to get back to work and by afternoon he was roping calves on horseback in his cast.

I use times like those days on the brand crew, to add the grit and character to my art, that only living the life can inspire. Into the second week, I was working with Mark, who we all knew as "Gootz", roping and dragging calves when, for a split second, I saw the image I knew I had to paint. A vision that perfectly captured the spirit and freedom of the cowboys who work the high plains rough country-a place they call home."
 
MASTERWORK CANVAS EDITION
Image size:
40"w x 32"h.
Edition Size:25

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $1,250.00




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Limited Edition on Canvas



Title

"When this weather quits,...you can stiff'n your hat back up with sugar water,..
n' hell,... if your hard up fer food, you can eat the som-bitch!"

MASTERWORK CANVAS EDITION
Image size:
39"w x 30"h.
Edition Size:35

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $1,250.00



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Limited Edition On Canvas

"Head five miles that way,...and then go five miles that way,...

'bring back every critter ya find !"

by Bob Coronato

"I was part of a brand crew in North East Wyoming and South East Montana around the turn of this century. We were gathering 10,000 acres at a time, on a ranch that covered several counties, and two states. As we headed out that morning towards the Montana bad lands, the boss told us to head out five miles that way,... etc. I was wondering how we were supposed to know when we reached five miles? After all, my roots are back east where 100 acres is a big farm.

"Nevertheless we gathered up everything we found and headed them back to the portable corals set up near the camp. We had a chuck wagon, ranch bedroll wagon, a remuda of horses and we slept in wall tents on the prairie. We moved camp about every other day, covering 20 some miles between camps. As I recall we branded 300 cows a day for about two weeks.

"The country we were working was so rough, yet beautiful and vast. It really impressed me as to the scale of the workplace where we were going to spend the days ahead, gathering the cow calves for branding. From Ridge Montana (population about 15) up to Rocky Point and Lightning Flats, I have the greatest memories, of some of the roughest countryside. The West really lives on in this small hideout of our country."


SMALLWORK CANVAS EDITION
Image size:
17"w x 8"h.
Edition Size:75

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $225.00




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Open Edition Art Print

signed by the Artist
20.00



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Open Edition Poster

signed by the Artist
20.00



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Limited Edition on Canvas

Title

The Northern Range: "If you dont like the weather,...just wait fifteen minutes"

"The weather in the northern range is very unpredictable and can go from unbearably hot to snowing in the span of just a few hours; it pays to be prepared for any condition. One June morning we were trailing cows up into the cooler high country. We had to go about 27 miles up through hill country to the summer pasture. The weather went from clear, temperate conditions to rain and then sleet; by noon we had almost a foot of snow. The next day was the town rodeo and the day dawned 85 degrees and sunny. The joke up here is ‘take off your long johns on July 4, and put them back on July 5.'"


LIMITED EDITION CANVAS
Image size:
12"w x 9"h.
Edition Size:75

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $200.00



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Limited Edition on Art Paper

"Wyoming is,.. What America Once Was "

Limited Edition
S/N
500


75.00



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Limited Edition On Canvas

MASTERWORK CANVAS EDITION
Image size:
18"w x 44"h.
Edition Size:25

Published from the artist's original work by Greenwich Workshop.
.

US: $795.00

These are very nice and impressive!

 




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Open Edition Poster

Signed by the Artist

20.00



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Poetry Gathering Poster (sold out)





            ...........................Sold Out






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